A durbar on health and menstrual hygiene has been organised for more than 1,000 girls in Volta Region to help the youngsters stay in school and study.

The durbar is part of a nationwide campaign being carried out by Touching The Lives of Girls Foundation (TLGF), a Nongovernmental Organisation, to ensure menstruating girls settle in schools throughout the terms of Ghana’s education calendar.

A baseline data by the Foundation shows that 52 per cent of Ghanaian girls aged 13- 20 who are menstruating refuse to be in school, especially contact hours, for sometimes one week due to absence of sanitary pads and guidance and counselling services.

Nana Ama Adutwumwaa, the Chief Executive Officer of TLGF, told the Ghana News Agency that the development was badly affecting reproductive health and education of female children in the country.

She said a mini durbar was therefore organised by the organisation in Kpando for over 1,000 girls to educate them on personal hygiene during menstruation and also overcome the trauma they go through.

“There is the need for a concerted national effort to deal with this problem since it disrupts the education of young girls and adversely impacts on their reproductive health,” she said.

“When a girl has a period for the first time, it is a distinct step into womanhood,” she added: “but, the challenge is, most of us go through our periods secretively and don’t really bother to figure out if our practices are hygienic or not.”

“At times, we may wear the same for a whole day; as a big ‘sister’, l am here to share some tips as l have done with other girls throughout Ghana to help you stay clean and hygienic during your periods, increase your attention span during lessons and increase general attendance to school.”

Queen Mothers of the Kpando Traditional area have since pledged their support for menstrual hygiene campaign to help young females who mostly face physical, mental and emotional challenges.

Source:www.updghana.com